R.A.C.E. Method,Constructed Response, and Citing Textual Evidence

Today in class we reviewed how to answer constructed response questions – a skill you started building last year in 9th grade. As you work on answering the constructed response questions over Cupid and Psyche’ the next two days, be sure to refer to the notes from class and the helpful rubrics and worksheets you were given.

RACE thumbnail

 

You can also refer to the example we did in class below – this is the answer to question one from your assignment: “Why is Venus so jealous of Psyche? Does it make sense for the goddess of love and beauty to be jealous? Why or why not?”

IMG_20150817_141010481

 

Remember, I will be using the same rubric that will be used on your 11th Grade EOC Test next year to grade your constructed responses – Its never too early to start preparing!

Click here to access the constructed response rubric I will be using to grade these assignments with.

Click here to access the constructed response questions over Cupid and Psyche if you lost your sheet from class.

Remember, when citing textual evidence you have three steps to follow.

  • First, be sure to include a signal phrase. This is a phrase, in your own words, that will lead into the quote. For example:  Cupid refused to let Psyche see his face, saying “I would rather you love me as I am that as a god” (Coolidge 223).
  • Next, you need to quote directly from the text, and put quotation marks around the text. For example: Cupid refused to let Psyche see his face, saying “I would rather you love me as I am that as a god” (Coolidge 223).
  • Finally, you need to list the authors last name and the page number in parenthesis after the quote, and then end with a period. For example: Cupid refused to let Psyche see his face, saying “I would rather you love me as I am that as a god” (Coolidge 223). 

Follow these steps and you’ll have citing textual evidence down perfectly!

10th Grade Literature Spring 2018

Cupid and Psyche and La Belle et La Bete – Close Reading

Students – the past few days we have been reading and examining the Ancient Greek story of Cupid and Psyche in class. Below you will find some of the notes we took together  -use them to add to your own notes or help you study. You will be completing an analysis of The Hero’s Journey in “Cupid and Psyche” in class this week and answering a series of constructed response questions about the story – make sure you are taking notes and studying each night for your first Unit Test!

IMG_20150813_125649

 

Click here to read the story of Cupid and Psyche

You will also look at how Ancient Greek literature has influenced literature around the world – all the way to present day. To do this you will be looking at a classic French story, La Belle et La Bete, and comparing the two. You will notice that this French story is the basis for the modern version of Beauty and the Beast that many of you are familiar with!

Beauty and the Beast

10th Grade Literature Spring 2018

Making Connections and Predictions – The Story of Prometheus

Students – today in class we read the story of Prometheus’ Creation of Man and The Coming Evil.  We also practiced how to make connections and prediction with our easy ‘Connection and Predictions’ chart. This is a skill you will need to build, as it will DEFINITELY come in handy throughout the semester – we will be reading stories from many different cultures, and being about to make connections to similar texts will help you understand and analyse the new texts more quickly.

Attached below you will find the ‘Connections and Predictions’ chart from class –

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Use this chart with the following story, making connections between the Ancient Greek story ‘The Great Flood’ and the Biblical story of ‘Noah’s Ark’.

Click on the link below to access the Word document of the story –

Prometheus – The Great Flood

10th Grade Literature Spring 2018

Revisiting Poetry Through “The Odyssey”

As we prepare for our 9 weeks exam, it is important to go back and review the lessons learned about poetry and the analysis of poetry in our last unit, as you will need to know this on the exam – luckily, we can do this through poetry about the epic we just read: The Odyssey.

 

In class we will be examining three poems whose primary source of inspiration and allusion is Homer’s epic – Marerget Atwood’s poem ‘Siren Song’, Edna St. Vincent Millay’s poem ‘The Ancient Gesture’ and Constantine Cavfey’s poem ‘Ithaca’. As you examine each poem, remember to follow the steps of analysis that we have been practicing – TOASTTT.

Don’t remember what TOASTTT is? Here’s a helpful reminder:

toasttt

Make sure you are able and comfortable completing a TOASTTT analysis for each of these three poems, and that you can answer the questions below:

  1. What is ironic about the siren’s song in the poem ‘Siren Song’?
  2. What is the ‘ancient gesture’ that Millay mentions, and how do Penelope and Odysseus express this gesture differently?
  3. What is ‘Ithaca’ supposed to mean/represent in the poem by Cafvey?

 

Please click the links below to access the poems if you need them:

The Ancient Gesture
1

The Siren’s Song
johnwilliamwaterhouseulisseelesirene1891

Ithaca
ithaki-vathy

 

9th Grade Literature Fall 2016

The Odyssey – Odysseus Returns Home

This week we will be looking at Part 2 of the Odyssey. While part 1 focused on Odysseus’ adventures, travels and journey back home over ten years, part 2 covers a much shorter period of time… namely, his immediate return home, his fight to regain his kingdom and wife, and his reconciliation with Penelope and his son Telemachus.

In this section you will be keeping your notes in your spinning graphic organizer, focusing on the following relationships:

How does Odysseus view:

  • Himself
  • His wife Penelope
  • The Suitors who have come to marry his wife
  • His son Telemachus

You will also record how the reader views:

  • Odysseus
  • Penelope
  • The Suitors
  • Telemachus

Remember – how we view these characters today may differ greatly from how they were intended to be viewed by the Greeks 3,000 years ago. Be sure to be able to justify your interpretation of these characters with evidence from the text, recorded in your graphic organizer!

If you have forgotten what happens in Part 1 of The Odyssey, or just need a review before our exam, please watch the video from Crash Course below to review!

9th Grade Literature Fall 2016

R.A.C.E. Method,Constructed Response, and Citing Textual Evidence

Today in class we reviewed how to answer constructed response questions – a skill you started building last year in 9th grade. As you work on answering the constructed response questions over Cupid and Psyche’ the next two days, be sure to refer to the notes from class and the helpful rubrics and worksheets you were given.

RACE thumbnail

 

You can also refer to the example we did in class below – this is the answer to question one from your assignment: “Why is Venus so jealous of Psyche? Does it make sense for the goddess of love and beauty to be jealous? Why or why not?”

IMG_20150817_141010481

 

Remember, I will be using the same rubric that will be used on your 11th Grade EOC Test next year to grade your constructed responses – Its never too early to start preparing!

Click here to access the constructed response rubric I will be using to grade these assignments with.

Click here to access the constructed response questions over Cupid and Psyche if you lost your sheet from class.

Remember, when citing textual evidence you have three steps to follow.

  • First, be sure to include a signal phrase. This is a phrase, in your own words, that will lead into the quote. For example:  Cupid refused to let Psyche see his face, saying “I would rather you love me as I am that as a god” (Coolidge 223).
  • Next, you need to quote directly from the text, and put quotation marks around the text. For example: Cupid refused to let Psyche see his face, saying “I would rather you love me as I am that as a god” (Coolidge 223).
  • Finally, you need to list the authors last name and the page number in parenthesis after the quote, and then end with a period. For example: Cupid refused to let Psyche see his face, saying “I would rather you love me as I am that as a god” (Coolidge 223). 

Follow these steps and you’ll have citing textual evidence down perfectly!

10th Grade Literature Spring 2016

Cupid and Psyche – Close Reading

Students – the past few days we have been reading and examining the Ancient Greek story of Cupid and Psyche in class. Below you will find some of the notes we took together  -use them to add to your own notes or help you study. You will be completing an analysis of The Hero’s Journey in “Cupid and Psyche” in class this week and answering a series of constructed response questions about the story – make sure you are taking notes and studying each night for your first Unit Test!

IMG_20150813_125649

 

Click here to read the story of Cupid and Psyche

 

10th Grade Literature Spring 2016