Diagramming Sentences: Relative Pronouns (Adjective Clauses)

Before you can effectively write using the English language, or even analyze how others use writing effectively, you need to be familiar with the basic parts and components of the English language. Knowing and being able to identify these smaller component of your own language will allow you to write more effectively and assess and improve your own writing as the year progresses.

This week we will be examining how to correctly diagram relative pronouns.

Relative Pronouns are words that introduce adjective clauses : who, whom, whose, that, which.

Relative Adverbs can also introduce adjective clauses: where, why, when…

An adjective clause is a dependent clause that is used as an adjective. That means the whole clause modifies a noun or pronoun.

This is the house that Jack built.

That Jack built is a whole clause modifying the noun house That Jack built is an adjective clause.

Relative pronouns or relative adverbs link adjective clauses with the word in the independent clause that the adjective modified. The relative pronouns may act as a subject, direct object, object of the preposition, or a modifier within the adjective clause.

 

 

 

Now practice with the following sentences:

  1. I love the person who vaccumed the living room!
  2. Stacy walked slowing into the house that was haunted.
  3. The woman with whom I spoke sold real estate.
  4.  Are coaches who are also teachers paid double?
  5. The Christmas presents, which were wrapped in gold and green paper, looked perfect under the tree.
  6. The couples, who looked so happy and in love, danced all night.
  7. I gave her the carton of milk, which had been sitting in the fridge.

 

11th Grade American Literature Fall 2019

Diagramming Sentence: Prepositional Phrases

Before you can effectively write using the English language, or even analyze how others use writing effectively, you need to be familiar with the basic parts and components of the English language. Knowing and being able to identify these smaller component of your own language will allow you to write more effectively and assess and improve your own writing as the year progresses.

This week we will be examining how to correctly diagram adjectives and adverbs. Remember, you must pay attention to whether the adjective or adverb describes the verb or subject or direct object of a sentence, or if the adverb is modifying an adjective to determine where you should place it in your diagram.

A prepositional phrase is a group of words that begin with a preposition and end with a noun. The whole phrases functions as either an adjective or adverb.

But what is a preposition? The technical definition is that a preposition is a word that shows the relationship between nouns or pronouns and other elements in the rest of the sentence. The easy definition is that a preposition is anything a worm can do to an apple:

 

Remember, when a prepositional phrase acts as an adjective, it modifies nouns and pronouns:

 

When prepositional phrases act as adverbs the modify verbs, adverbs or adjectives:

Remember, when a prepositional phrase acts as an adjective it can modify any noun or pronoun – not just those in the subject. Sometimes they modify the object of another prepositional phrase:

Practice diagramming prepositional phrases with the sentences below:

  1. The exquisite, red flowers in the garden are growing strong.
  2. Has Lucy been reading all night?
  3. The hot air balloon floated above the puffy, white clouds.
  4. Little Jack Horner sat in the corner of the room.
  5. The chocolate chip cookie dough is in the back of the freezer.
  6. The rusty lawnmower with the broken axle sat in my garage.
  7. In May, the vigorous plants in Cathy’s vegetable garden grow very quickly.

8. Which of these is NOT a prepositional phrase?

  • in the journal
  • at the table
  • how are you
  • on the floor

9. True or False: Some prepositions show time and place and others add detail.

10. True or false: As an adverb, a prepositional phrase will answer questions such as How? When? or Where?

11.Most people in Japan follow the traditional customs of their country.  Is this prepositional phrase acting as an adjective or adverb ?

12. The Japanese traditionally bow on certain occasions.  Is this prepositional phrase acting as an adjective or adverb?

 

 

11th Grade American Literature Fall 2019

Diagramming Sentences – Adjective and Adverbs

Before you can effectively write using the English language, or even analyze how others use writing effectively, you need to be familiar with the basic parts and components of the English language. Knowing and being able to identify these smaller component of your own language will allow you to write more effectively and assess and improve your own writing as the year progresses.

This week we will be examining how to correctly diagram adjectives and adverbs. Remember, you must pay attention to whether the adjective or adverb describes the verb or subject or direct object of a sentence, or if the adverb is modifying an adjective to determine where you should place it in your diagram.

Please watch the video below if you need an example, or didn’t get the notes from class.

image from english-grammar-revolution.com

You will be diagramming the sentences below as examples:

  1. Two fat birds chirped.
  2. That cute baby has been laughing.
  3. Will my mother sing?
  4. The lovely, scented candle burned brightly.
  5. Very politely, Henry bowed.
  6. The little red bird flew rather gracefully.

    image from english-grammar-revolution.com

  7. Where did that fat cat go?
  8. Who is eating so noisily?
  9. Can my chicken stay here?
  10. Stop rudely slurping that soup!
11th Grade American Literature Fall 2019

Diagramming Sentences – The Basics

Before you can effectively write using the English language, or even analyze how others use writing effectively, you need to be familiar with the basic parts and components of the English language. I know grammar isn’t your favorite subject to study and learn (hey, it isn’t my favorite either), BUT knowing and being able to identify these smaller component of your own language will allow you to write more effectively and assess and improve your own writing as the year progresses.

 

We’re going to begin by  looking at sentence diagramming. Many of you can list off the parts of speech, but you may not actually know how these parts fit together to create syntactical structures. We’ll begin by looking are very basic, simple sentences. These will contain a Subject, Verb and Direct Object. We’ll then move on to sentences that also contain Adjectives.

Please review the videos below from class, and practice with the sample sentence below.

  1. The flowers grew.
  2. Birds were singing.
  3. The bunnies hopped.
  4. Cally was sleeping peacefully.
  5. Sydney has been hiking.
  6. May I play?
  7. Did Josh eat dinner?
  8. Should we have been reading?
  9. Are they coming?
  10. Can I sing?

 

11th Grade American Literature Fall 2019

Parts of Speech: Adverbs

Now that we’ve reviewed pronouns and how to identify and use them correctly, we’ll move on to the second part of speech that your assessment indicated you needed to review: adverbs.

 

Adverbs describe or modify verbs, adjective or other nouns. Simple adverbs indicate one of five elements – time, manner, place, degree and frequency. 

Click here to view the powerpoint over adverbs from class. 

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10th Grade Literature Spring 2019

Parts of Speech – Pronouns

After our parts of speech pre-assessment yesterday, it seems we need to cover some of the different elements of pronouns together.

There are proper nouns, which give a specific name to an organization, person or place.

There are also personal pronouns, which identify a specific person place or thing and indicate singularity or plurality, and antecedents, which replace or reference pronouns.

Click here to review the pronoun powerpoint for our warm-ups this week.

You can also review the video below if you are having trouble with pronouns and antecedents:

Additionally, we discussed possessive pronouns. One thing to remember here is that possessive pronouns do not have apostrophes. ‘

Many of you were using it’s instead its. 

We also examined relative pronouns, which connect two clauses two a nouns or pronoun.

For example, “Cecil, who cannot swim, avoid fishing on the open water.” The first clause “Cecil avoids fishing on the open water” is connected to “who cannot swim”, as ‘who’ is the relative pronoun referring to Cecil.

 

10th Grade Literature Spring 2019