Sinners In The Hands of An Angry God – Johnathan Edwards

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As we move into ‘The Great Awakening’ in our study of American Literature, we will be analyzing the rhetorical power of Edward’s famous sermon, “Sinners In The Hands Of An Angry God”. Edward’s use of startling imagery and terrifying depictions of the wrath of God are shocking even for today’s modern audience, but would have been absolutely terrifying to the members of his congregation during his own time period.

Below you will find a brief video with background information on Edwards that YOU SHOULD DEFINITELY WATCH FIRST, follow by a PDF of the Sermon and the audio to the sermon. Download the PDF and follow along as you listen to the Youtube video of the sermon… make notes of the rhetoric Edward’s uses. You can use the SOAPSTone Plus method we learned in class for this:

As we begin to examine an author’s use of rhetoric to achieve a specific purpose remember that this will be a huge part of AP Language next semester! That means you need to practice the method of SOAPSTone Plus. Begin practicing the SOAPSTone Plus analysis method – you will use it from now on!

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After you have become comfortable with just finding the use of these rhetorical devices, you can begin analyzing texts in the Arch Method. This will streamline you note taking over your analysis, and can be a life saver during the timed Rhetorical Analysis essay on the AP Language and Composition Exam. Below you can find a sample of the Arch Method process, as well as an example of how to conduct the Arch Method Analysis with Mary Rowlandson’s “A Narrative of the Captivity”.

 Arch Method Arch Method Rowlandson

*Click on the images for an enlarged view

Click here for “Sinners In the Hands of An Angry God.”

And finally, click here for the full audio of his sermon. 

 

Can’t wait to discuss this with you tomorrow! 🙂

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11th Grade American Literature Fall 2019

Anne Bradstreet Poetry Analysis and Video Notes

 

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Anne Bradstreet – and some ducks.

Please see the video below for the notes over Anne Bradstreet that you will need for class. Remember to keep in mind the differences between the use of literary devices and emotional appeals in Bradstreet’s poetry, as you’ll have to compare it to Johnathan Edwards’s sermon “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God” at some point this week!

As we analyze ‘The My Dear and Loving Husband’, but sure to pay attention to how Bradstreet always manages to connect her expressions of humanity and worldliness with her pious beliefs. Also, be sure to know the significance behind many of her allusions! If you need a refresher on how to annotate and analyze a text, see our handout from class here. 

see our handout from class here. 

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11th Grade American Literature Fall 2019

Narrative Writing

In addition to writing academic essays you also need to practice crafting interesting stories through narrative. Being comfortable using the elements of narrative writing not only makes it easier to read and understand narrative choices an author makes in the stories we read in class, but it can also be a useful tool to spice up your academic writing as well.

Remember, there are key elements we’ve covered in class for narrative writing. These include:

  • Having multiple characters that interact or speak with each other.
  • Using descriptive language that appeals to the senses.
  • Using dialogue – either internal or external (and formatting it correctly!)
  • Making the setting, POV and plot clear to the reader.
  • Having a thematic conclusion.

Many of you have had difficultly with the thematic conclusion – let’s review how to do this in the video below from class:

Consider this – will you be able to complete all of these points in just a few sentences? No. You will need to make sure your narrative is adequately developed. Let’s look at the examples below:

Sample 1

This samples scored a 1/4 – what elements can you see are missing?

 

 

Sample 2

This samples scored a 3/4 – do you see how it includes dialogue and description? Despite formatting and grammatical errors, the development and use of elements was still solid.

 

 

Sample 3

This samples scored a 4/4. The student has clear characters, dialogue, description, and a plot. The story is developed in three short paragraphs, and has a conclusion.

 

Remember, I will be assessing your writing with the same rubric the state will use.

Please click here to access the rubric.

 

You also will need to track your own progress on these writing – please be sure to look back at your growth and take note of which elements you are improving on – you can make sure to repeat that performance in the future! Click here to access your tracking chart for class.

11th Grade American Literature Fall 2019

Diagramming Sentences – Adjective and Adverbs

Before you can effectively write using the English language, or even analyze how others use writing effectively, you need to be familiar with the basic parts and components of the English language. Knowing and being able to identify these smaller component of your own language will allow you to write more effectively and assess and improve your own writing as the year progresses.

This week we will be examining how to correctly diagram adjectives and adverbs. Remember, you must pay attention to whether the adjective or adverb describes the verb or subject or direct object of a sentence, or if the adverb is modifying an adjective to determine where you should place it in your diagram.

Please watch the video below if you need an example, or didn’t get the notes from class.

image from english-grammar-revolution.com

You will be diagramming the sentences below as examples:

  1. Two fat birds chirped.
  2. That cute baby has been laughing.
  3. Will my mother sing?
  4. The lovely, scented candle burned brightly.
  5. Very politely, Henry bowed.
  6. The little red bird flew rather gracefully.

    image from english-grammar-revolution.com

  7. Where did that fat cat go?
  8. Who is eating so noisily?
  9. Can my chicken stay here?
  10. Stop rudely slurping that soup!
11th Grade American Literature Fall 2019

Native American Oral Tradition

SachemThe native people of this land did not pass their stories down through books and letters, but rather through the sharing and memorizing of stories by word-of-mouth, also know as the oral tradition. Native American tribes across the Americas had a rich tradition of storytelling that served to explain the natural world around them, define their relationship with nature, and record and remember their tribal history. Interestingly, it was the role of the women in the tribes to preserve this history, tell these stories, and pass this knowledge down to the next generation of the tribe.

As we begin our study of American Literature, we will start with the traditions of this country’s native people and discuss how their traditions fit into the larger context of global literary traditions, and examine how their literary and oral traditions were affected, changed, and unfortunately in many cases, eradicated by the influx of explorers and settlers.

We will be reading three creation stories –Click here to access the Native American Creation Myths

Additionally, the video below provide an overview of the literary oral tradition of the Native Americans. We will be taking notes over this in class, and you may re-watch the video as many times as needed below:

While watching this video you need to practice the Cornell Note-taking methods we reviewed in class today. If you forgot how to do this, please see the post on how to take these notes.

Click here to access the example notes over Native American Literary Tradition in the Cornell Note style.

Also, remember that we’re not just examining the oral tradition of the Native Americans, but also how their storytelling tradition fits into the larger context of literature. You should hopefully remember your study of archetypes from 9th grade, but in case you have forgotten please visit the link below to view a Prezi I have put together for you to review.

Click here to view the Prezi on Archetypes.

As you review the story, be sure to answer the question: How does ‘The Earth on the Turtle’s Back’ represent the themes of Native American storytelling?

Also, be sure to consider how the settings (Skyland, The Great Tree, Earth as a lush land of plants and animals) and characters (The Great Chief, the pregnant Wife, the Muskrat and all the other animals) are archetypes.

Please click here to access the Cornell Notes we took together over the creation myths ‘The Navajo Legend’ and ‘When Grizzles Stood Upright’. 

In class we reviewed and practiced how to write concise summaries of texts – this is an important skill for discussion, for review and studying and for comprehension.

Please click here to review the handout over writing quality summaries.

We practiced summarizing the creation stories “The Earth on the Turtle’s Back” and “When Grizzlies Walked Upright”, as well as summarizing how the themes of Native American creation stories were present in each of them.

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11th Grade American Literature Fall 2019

Naturalism in American Literature

As we move away from the Realist period in American literature and into the 20th century, we approach the literary period known as ‘Naturalism’. While many of the other periods of writing in American literature had fairly distinct timelines and major events that acted as ‘endcaps’, the Naturalist period overlaps many of the other time periods – Realism, and The Harlem Renaissance. While very similar to Realism, there are distinct differences between the two periods:realism-and-naturalism-in-acting-context-6-638

As we read through these texts, pay attention to how we are finally presented with stories that have characters who struggle with their emotions and their own psychology. We will also be examining stories that develop the struggles of characters in poverty and characters who are disenfranchised in society.

 

Please watch the video below to catch up on your in-class notes if you missed them!

11th Grade American Literature Spring 2018

Charlotte Perkins Gilman – The Yellow Wallpaper

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Over the next two days we will be reading the short story “The Yellow Wallpaper” by Charlotte Perkins Gilman. A feminist, social reformer and novelist, Gilman based the story of “The Yellow Wallpaper” on her own experiences with depression and the popular 19th century ‘rest cure’. In her short story she examines the impact that this ‘cure’ has on the mental state of her female protagonist, and makes a clear statement against the control that a patriarchal society held over every aspect of women’s lives in the 19th century.

 

As we examine this text, remember to apply the lens of Feminist Criticism to your analysis. If you’ve forgotten how to do this, remember:

Feminist Criticism:  Feminist criticism is concerned with the impact of gender on writing and
reading. It usually begins with a critique of patriarchal culture. It is concerned with the place of female writers in the literary cannon. Finally, it includes a search for a feminine theory or approach to texts. Feminist criticism is political and often revisionist. Feminists often argue that male fears are portrayed through female characters. They may argue that gender determines everything, or just the opposite: that all gender differences are imposed by society, and gender determines nothing.

Advantages: Women have been underrepresented in the traditional cannon, and a feminist approach to literature attempts to redress this problem.

Disadvantages: Feminists turn literary criticism into a political battlefield and overlook the merits of works they consider “patriarchal.” When arguing for a distinct feminine writing style, they tend to relegate women’s literature to a ghetto status; this in turn prevents female literature from being naturally included in the literary cannon. The feminist approach is often too theoretical.

Checklist of Feminist Critical Questions:

  • To what extent does the representation of women (and men) in the work reflect the place and time in which the work was written?
  • How are the relationships between men and women or those between members of the same sex presented in the work?
  • What roles do men and women assume and perform and with what consequences?
  • Does the author present the work from within a predominantly male or female sensibility?
  • Why might this have been done, and with what effects?
  • How do the facts of the author’s life relate to the presentation of men and women in the work? To their relative degrees of power?
  • How do other works by the author correspond to this one in their depiction of the power relationships between men and women?

Please click here for access to Gilman’s story “The Yellow Wallpaper”.

11th Grade American Literature Spring 2018