Diagramming Sentences – Coordinating Conjunctions

Before you can effectively write using the English language, or even analyze how others use writing effectively, you need to be familiar with the basic parts and components of the English language. I know grammar isn’t your favorite subject to study and learn (hey, it isn’t my favorite either), BUT knowing and being able to identify these smaller component of your own language will allow you to write more effectively and assess and improve your own writing as the year progresses.

This week we will be examining how to correctly diagram sentences with conjunctions.

We structure each compound element different in our sentence diagrams. Here are examples of how to diagram compound subjects, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, and objects of the preposition.

The following sentences will only contain compound words that you will need to diagram.

  1. Mr. Travers teaches at the school and plays outside at recces.
  2. Matt and Dina learn from Mr. Tavers.
  3. Lori’s blue and green dress has been drying on the clothesline in the yard.
  4. I looked for the jacket in the house and the car.
  5. Scott jogged quickly and quietly onto the soccer field.

Phrases are groups of words that function as a single part of speech. We studied prepositional phrases last week, and now you will learn to diagram sentences with prepositional phrases and conjunctions.

The following sentences will contain compound phrases you will need to diagram:

  1. The students were running in the halls and were sent to the principals office.
  2. My sister drove around the block and up the hill.
  3. The crazy little dog ran out the door and toward the stranger.
  4. Lori and Lisa were laughing and howling at the funny movie.
  5. Jason looked in the garage and around the house.

A sentence is a group of words that express a complete thought. We can make sentences compound by putting two or more independent clauses together with coordinating conjunctions.

The following sentences will have two independent clauses connected by a conjunction:

  1. The little kitty in the basket meowed, and the small girl smiled.
  2. He drove across town, but she walked.
  3. Have you tried, or did you just ask for help?
  4. The man in the backyard cried, for he  fell from the tall ladder.
  5. Should you have been running towards the dog, or should you have been running away from it?
10th Grade Literature Spring 2018

Creating Poetry to Reflect World Themes

In this assignment you will create two poems that reflect the themes or images you have observed in the literature of your world culture. These two poems must:

• Be a minimum of 14 lines long.
o If creating a blackout poem, the poem must be at least two pages.
• Reflect a clear theme.
• Use five poetic devices, three of which are common in the poetry of your culture.

To help you decide on the topic of theme of your own poems, review the information regarding the poems from you country that you’ve already read, and the information you’ve already researched. Then, decide which of these themes or devices you will be using in your own poem.

 

 

Remember, poetry uses figurative language (imagery, metaphors, similes, hyperbole) and sound devices (rhyme and rhyme scheme, alliteration, anaphora, repetition). You should use a mix of these in your own poem. Decided on the POV for your poem – 1st, 2nd or 3rd. Will your poem tell a story or share a scene or experience, or have a metaphorical discussion about a topic or theme? Remember, you don’t just have to write your poetry, you can create it with blackout poetry:

“Blackout poems can be created using the pages of old books or even articles cut from yesterday’s newspaper. Using the pages of an existing text, blackout poets isolate then piece together single words or short phrases from these texts to create lyrical masterpieces.

Step 1: Scan the page first before reading it completely. Keep an eye out for an anchor word as you scan. An anchor word is one word on the page that stands out to you because it is packed and loaded with meaning and significance.  Starting with an anchor word is important because it helps you to imagine possible themes and topics for your poem.

Step 2: Now read the page of text in its entirety. Use a pencil to lightly circle any words that connect to the anchor word and resonate with you. Resonant words might be expressive or evocative, but for whatever reason, these are the words on the page that stick with you. Avoid circling more than three words in a row.

Step 3: List all of the circled words on a separate piece of paper. List the words in the order that they appear on the page of text from top to bottom, left to right. The words you use for the final poem will remain in this order so it doesn’t confuse the reader.

Step 4: Select words, without changing their order on the list, and piece them together to create the lines of a poem. You can eliminate parts of words, especially any endings, if it helps to keep the meaning of the poem clear. Try different possibilities for your poem before selecting the lines for your final poem. If you are stuck during this step, return back to the original page of text. The right word you are searching for could be there waiting for you.

Step 5: Return to the page of text and circle only the words you selected for the final poem.  Remember to also erase the circles around any words you will not be using.

Step 6: Add an illustration or design to the page of text that connects to your poem. Be very careful not to draw over the circled words you selected for your final poem!”

Source: https://www.scholastic.com/teachers/blog-posts/john-depasquale/blackout-poetry/

10th Grade Literature Spring 2018

The Shape of Stories

In the next two weeks  we will be reading and examining a series of short stories, and discussing the ‘shape’ of short stories – their plots.

 

Many of you are probably familiar with a simplified version of Freytag’s Pyramid :middle-school-plot-diagram (1)

plot-shape-conflict-2-638However, while this is an easy way to remember the typical form of plot progression in Western storytelling, it is not completely accurate. Not all, not most, stories follow this plot progress. Stories have their own ‘shape’ – and the more interesting the plot of the story, the more interesting the shape.

Listen to amazing short story writer Kurt Vonnegut explain the ‘shape of stories’ by clicking the link below.

Click here to listen to Kurt Vonnegut’s ‘The Shape of Stories’.

Vonnegut explains that stories are much more complex that the typical Freytag’s Pyramid.

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Think of movies you’ve watched – what type of ‘shape’ did the plot create? Think about tv shows – each episode has its own plot, and then all the episodes in a season create a larger plot as well.

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As we read through the short stories in this unit I want you to consider the ‘shape’ of these stories. You will need to keep track of them – and decide which ‘shape’ make for the most interesting story.

Also remember that we’re looking at the shape of Western stories (stories from American or Europe) – stories from other cultures in Asian and the Middle East follow a much different plot structure. Stories in Asian culture are often told in a cyclical or spiral manner:

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If you’ve ever watched an Asian movie or tv show (Dragon Ball Z) and felt like so much information was being repeated, or that the story took a really long time to ‘get going’, it was probably because their storytelling structure is so different from ours.

Some modern storytellers and movie-makers like Christopher Nolan are trying to use new and interesting plot structures – if you’ve seen these movies and have been confused about what’s happen, that’s probably why!

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10th Grade Literature Spring 2018

Conducting Research – Determining the Reliability of Sources

As we being our unit on World Literature, you will be deciding which culture you would like to research and explore in your groups. You will also need to brainstorm six questions about this culture or literature you would like to find the answers to.

Once you have decided which culture’s literature you’re focusing on, and have determine which set of questions you want to research the answers to, you will need to make sure you use only RELIABLE SOURCES!

Remember, reliable sources are those that can be trusted to provide unbiased, factual information. Reliable sources include .org, .gov or .edu websites, books, news organizations, educational journals or publications.

Unreliable sources cannot be trusted for accuracy or for an unbiased perspective. Unreliable sources include Wikipedia, Yahoo Answers, any .net or .com website, blogs, editorials from newspapers, or forums.

Click here to view the worksheet from class on reliable vs unreliable sources.

Remember, if you have a hard time determine if a source is reliable or not, you can always ask us to check it with you!

You will need to gather information from reliable sources to answer the questions you’ve selected from above, and be sure to paste the information in your GoogleDocs. You will need to use this information throughout the week to write an extended essay response, so please save your research!

10th Grade Literature Spring 2018

Translating the Poetry of Sappho

For the past two days we have been examining the lyric poetry of Ancient Greece, and are focusing our attention on one poem in particular by the female poet Sappho. We discussed literary devices you should be looking for in poetry (see the Unit 1 Vocabulary post for the list) and now you are ready to begin analyzing poetry!

In class we looked at an original version of the poem in Greek script, in Roman script and Greek Language, and then two translations of the poem into English. The first translation is from the 1870’s, which means the diction you will find in it is a little ‘old fashioned’. The final translations of the poem is in a modern version, which should be much easier to read!

Click here to read the four versions of the Sappho Love Poem

Remember, you should be identifying the devices listed below for each poem, and explaining the elements in Part 2 on a separate piece of paper. Everything you needs for this analysis should be in your notes over Ancient Greek Poets and vocabulary.

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Over the next few days you will read and analyze these poems in class and on your own, before writing your own translation of Sappho’s poem!

Click here for the assignment sheet over ‘Writing Your Own Sapphic Poem’.

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10th Grade Literature Spring 2018

R.A.C.E. Method,Constructed Response, and Citing Textual Evidence

Today in class we reviewed how to answer constructed response questions – a skill you started building last year in 9th grade. As you work on answering the constructed response questions over Cupid and Psyche’ the next two days, be sure to refer to the notes from class and the helpful rubrics and worksheets you were given.

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You can also refer to the example we did in class below – this is the answer to question one from your assignment: “Why is Venus so jealous of Psyche? Does it make sense for the goddess of love and beauty to be jealous? Why or why not?”

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Remember, I will be using the same rubric that will be used on your 11th Grade EOC Test next year to grade your constructed responses – Its never too early to start preparing!

Click here to access the constructed response rubric I will be using to grade these assignments with.

Click here to access the constructed response questions over Cupid and Psyche if you lost your sheet from class.

Remember, when citing textual evidence you have three steps to follow.

  • First, be sure to include a signal phrase. This is a phrase, in your own words, that will lead into the quote. For example:  Cupid refused to let Psyche see his face, saying “I would rather you love me as I am that as a god” (Coolidge 223).
  • Next, you need to quote directly from the text, and put quotation marks around the text. For example: Cupid refused to let Psyche see his face, saying “I would rather you love me as I am that as a god” (Coolidge 223).
  • Finally, you need to list the authors last name and the page number in parenthesis after the quote, and then end with a period. For example: Cupid refused to let Psyche see his face, saying “I would rather you love me as I am that as a god” (Coolidge 223). 

Follow these steps and you’ll have citing textual evidence down perfectly!

10th Grade Literature Spring 2018

Cupid and Psyche and La Belle et La Bete – Close Reading

Students – the past few days we have been reading and examining the Ancient Greek story of Cupid and Psyche in class. Below you will find some of the notes we took together  -use them to add to your own notes or help you study. You will be completing an analysis of The Hero’s Journey in “Cupid and Psyche” in class this week and answering a series of constructed response questions about the story – make sure you are taking notes and studying each night for your first Unit Test!

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Click here to read the story of Cupid and Psyche

You will also look at how Ancient Greek literature has influenced literature around the world – all the way to present day. To do this you will be looking at a classic French story, La Belle et La Bete, and comparing the two. You will notice that this French story is the basis for the modern version of Beauty and the Beast that many of you are familiar with!

Beauty and the Beast

10th Grade Literature Spring 2018