The Odyssey – Traits of an Epic Hero

The Odyssey, a 3,000 year old epic poem by the blind bard Homer, focuses on the journey of the epic hero Odysseus. Having left his wife Penelope and his kingdom of Ithaca ten years earlier to fight in the Trojan War (detailed in Homer’s book The Iliad), Odysseus then spends ten years in The Odyssey trying to return home. Facing monster, mutinous men, Gods and Goddesses along the way, Odysseus must use all of his skill to return home and regain his family and kingdom.

Throughout The Odyssey Odysseus exhibits the traits of an epic hero in Greek culture – namely he has intelligence, physical strength, respect for the gods, and leadership. As you work through part 1 of The Odyssey, you will record citations from the text for each of the traits of an epic hero that Odysseus displays in your graphic organizer, similar to the one pictured below:

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You will also need to make sure that you cite examples of Odysseus’ fatal flaw – namely, his pride and arrogance.

Remember, as we read through this story you must keep up with your graphic organizer – you will be able to use it when you write your essay over The Odyssey and it will be a great study guide for the final exam!

9th Grade Literature Fall 2016 Uncategorized

Introducing Ancient Greek Literature and The Hero’s Journey

classical-greece-map-gr2Today in class we began out unit on Ancient Greek Literature and will be examining how these stories and tropes from Ancient Greece continue to impact our modern storytelling, language and culture.

Below you will find a link to the powerpoint over Ancient Greek culture and its importance that we reviewed today in class. Remember, understanding historical and cultural context is an important part of this course as we read literature from the past and cultures that are vastly different from our own.

Click here to download the powerpoint over Ancient Greek Culture and Literature.

We also had a lengthy discussion over the use of archetypes in literature.

Click here to open the interactive Prezi presentation over archetypes that we reviewed in class.

Finally, we also covered The Hero’s Journey in class today – a concept you should have studied in 9th Grade Literature during your reading of The Odyssey. Below you will find a link to the video explaining the different steps of Joseph Campbell’s Hero’s Journey that we took notes from, as well as a visual aid showing the steps of the Hero’s Journey. Remember, you will have a short quiz over this on Friday, January 7th!

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9th Grade Literature Fall 2016

Making TOASTTT – Analyzing Poetry

Do you feel overwhelmed by poetry? Do all of those metaphors and rhymes and allusions confuse you? Do you feel like you just don’t ‘get it’? Well you don’t have to feel like that anymore, because analyzing poetry is as easy as making buttered toast!

In class we will use the TOASTTT method to help us analyze poetry quickly and effectively.
toasttt

To practice the TOASTTT method I would like you to pick a song that you like and that you think is ‘poetic’. Then complete the chart below, making ‘TOASTTT’ with that song. Finally, after you have analyzed the song using the TOASTTT method, decide if its actually ‘poetry’, or if its just a really catchy song. Hint: if it doesn’t have very many literary devices to analyze, and the theme is very generic and not very meaningful, it might just be a catchy song.

Click here for the TOASTTT notes from class.

Click here for the blank TOASTTT chart you can use for your analysis.

 

9th Grade Literature Fall 2016

Welcome Freshman – Syllabus and 1st Day Paperwork

Students and parents – please click the links below for both the syllabus for this class (which details what materials you will need and the grading policy) as well as the Media Release form. Both of these will be due on Monday, August 8th 2016

Please use the next few days to familiarize yourself with the website, and to register for my Remind 101 text alerts on class assignments, tests and quizzes. You can find the registration information in your syllabus or at the bottom of the webpage! I’m excited to have a great year with you all!

9th Grade Syllabus

Media and Social Media Release

If you have trouble navigating the website, please see the ‘About’ section at the top of the page for more information!

keepCalmAndBackToSchool

9th Grade Literature Fall 2016

Making TOASTTT – Analyzing Poetry

Do you feel overwhelmed by poetry? Do all of those metaphors and rhymes and allusions confuse you? Do you feel like you just don’t ‘get it’? Well you don’t have to feel like that anymore, because analyzing poetry is as easy as making buttered toast!

In class we will use the TOASTTT method to help us analyze poetry quickly and effectively.
toasttt

To practice the TOASTTT method I would like you to pick a song that you like and that you think is ‘poetic’. Then complete the chart below, making ‘TOASTTT’ with that song. Finally, after you have analyzed the song using the TOASTTT method, decide if its actually ‘poetry’, or if its just a really catchy song. Hint: if it doesn’t have very many literary devices to analyze, and it the theme is very generic and not very meaningful, it might just be a catchy song.

Explain your reasoning in a paragraph that pulls quotes from the song to make your point. Be sure to cite these quotes correctly by following the examples below:

  • First, be sure to include a signal phrase. This is a phrase, in your own words, that will lead into the quote. For example:  Cupid refused to let Psyche see his face, saying “I would rather you love me as I am that as a god” (Coolidge 223).
  • Next, you need to quote directly from the text, and put quotation marks around the text. For example: Cupid refused to let Psyche see his face, saying “I would rather you love me as I am that as a god” (Coolidge 223).
  • Finally, you need to list the authors last name and the page number in parenthesis after the quote, and then end with a period. For example: Cupid refused to let Psyche see his face, saying “I would rather you love me as I am that as a god” (Coolidge 223). 

Click here for the TOASTTT notes from class.

Click here for the blank TOASTTT chart you can use for your song lyric analysis.

 

9th Grade Literature Spring 2016

9th Grade Literature Vocabulary

Students – please check back each week for the updates to your vocabulary list! We will have a quiz at the end of each week!

 

Week 1 Vocabulary:

  • Alliteration
  • Onomatopoeia
  • Repetition
  • Rhyme
  • End Rhyme
  • Slant Rhyme
  • Sight Rhyme
  • Allegory
  • Allusion
  • Analogy
  • Apostrophe
  • Cliché
  • Connotation
  • Denotation
  • Understatement
  • Hyperbole
  • Verbal Irony
  • Metaphor
  • Metonymy
  • Oxymoron
  • Paradox
  • Personification
  • Pun
  • Simile
  • Symbol
  • Synecdoche
  • Point of View
  • Stanza
  • Enjambment
  • Blank Verse
  • Free Verse
  • Epitaph
  • Haiku
  • Lyric
  • Ode
  • Sonnet
  • Imagery
  • Tone
  • Mood
9th Grade Literature Spring 2016