Expansionist Literature – The Market Revolution and The Era of Good Feelings

As we transition out of the Revolutionary Period it is incredibly important that you understand that literary periods are fluid…that means that there isn’t a line in the sand drawn between Revolutionary Literature and Romanticism right after 1776. The time after America’s Independence and the start of the Transcendental movement is an incredibly important few decades in which our economy, our borders, and our perception of what it means to be ‘American’ rapidly grew and changed. The literature from this time period reflects these changing viewpoints and the conflict that arises when social, political and economic upheaval happen all at once. Without this period of expansionism, we wouldn’t have the Transcendental movement.

Please review the questions and information at the beginning of Unit 3 in your book, and keep these in mind as you watch and take notes from the video below. These issues and conflicts will serve as the platform for most of the literature we read during this time period.

  • How do we build a nation?
  • Who can be called ‘American’?
  • How does Economic growth change ideals?
  • How far should our borders extend?
  • What is America’s responsibility to its citizen? Its inhabitants?

Click here to watch the Crash Course video over The Market Revolution

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11th Grade American Literature Spring 2018

Revolutionary Women: Phyllis Wheatley

Phillis Wheatley

 

Throughout our study of the literature of the American Revolution we have been primarily reading the texts of the founding fathers and other men of the period. However, women played an important role in the founding of our country and contributed greatly to its literature and political texts. Two women that made significant contributions to the arts and politics are Phyllis Wheatley and Abigail Adams.

 

Brought from Africa on the slave trade, Phyllis Wheatley was given a formal education by her masters, and went on to write some of the most beautiful poetry of early America. Hidden in her poems were a celebration of her faith and a criticism of the institution of slavery in America.

In class today we began analyzing her poem ‘On Being Brought from Africa to America’. Please watch the video below of this analysis if you need to review!

 

 

 

We will be exploring the following questions about Wheatley’s poem in class – remember, our ‘how’ and ‘why‘ questions are the important ones to consider!

  • What is her overall tone in the poem?
  • How does she establish that tone?
  • What metaphors did she use throughout the poem?
  • How did she use metaphors effectively to give her poem multiple meanings or ‘layers’.

This is the fourth poem we have analyzed and annotated together or in small group – you will have to work with a poem on your own for this unit test. Please make sure you are practicing and becoming comfortable with close reading and analysis!

11th Grade American Literature Spring 2018

The Declaration of Independence

We are examining our founding document – an amazing piece of text that brought us to where we are today, and inspired other nations to declare those own free and independent states.

The original Declaration of Independence, ink on parchment. It has been damaged by light and improper storage, and the text has almost faded completely over the past 241 years.

A facsimile copy of The Declaration of Independence, struck in the 19th century. Copies, posters and prints of the document are made from this copy, not the original.

 

Click here to view the real Declaration of Independence at the National Archive.

As we read, analyze and discuss this document please remember that we are looking at not only its importance historically but also its use of effective syntax, its appeals to rhetoric, and even the flaws of 18th century bias that it includes. Many of the ideals exposed in our founding document are held dear to us, but know the irony in that these ideals as we see them today were not extended to all people living in the new United States.

Please see the videos below over the history of the document and a performance of the Declaration.

Today we also learned how to take DoodleNotes, using The Declaration as an example. Please click here to access the notes.

As we analyze the text, remember to look for the appeals to rhetoric and be able to explain how the syntax of the document make its more effective. Be sure to read The National Archive’s analysis of The Declaration of Independence to inform your own analysis and understanding of the text:

“The text of the Declaration can be divided into five sections–the introduction, the preamble, the indictment of George III, the denunciation of the British people, and the conclusion. Because space does not permit us to explicate each section in full detail, we shall select features from each that illustrate the stylistic artistry of the Declaration as a whole.3

 

11th Grade American Literature Spring 2018

Revolutionary Literature

As we transition from literature of the Puritan period to literature of the American Revolution, it is important for you to understand that history and its accompanying literature transition SLOWLY – the colonist did not simply wake up one day and realize ‘Hey, we’re in a new literary time period! Let’s change our writing style and beliefs overnight!’. We began to see the slow shift from theocratic colonies obsessed with religion to a more secular, democratic society as we read The Crucible and discussed the real life events of the Salem Witch Trails. Below you will find our notes from class outlining what exactly happened to transition the ideas of the Puritan period to the ideas of the Revolutionary period. Additionally, you will also find a complete list of ideas, concepts, beliefs and characteristics of the Revolutionary period that you may refer to throughout this unit.

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Common Beliefs

  1. Faith in natural goodness – a human is born without taint or sin; the concept of tabula rasa or blank slate
  2. Perfectibility of a human being – it is possible to improve situations of birth, economy, society, and religion
  3. The sovereignty of reason – echoes of Rene Descartes’ cogito ergo sum or “I think, therefore, I am” (as the first certitude in resolving universal doubt)
  4. Universal benevolence – the attitude of helping everyone
  5. Outdated social institutions cause unsociable behavior – religious, social, economic, and political institutions, which have not modernized, force individuals into unacceptable behavior

Functions of the Writers of this Period

  1. A searching inquiry in all aspects of the world around
  2. Interest in the classics as well as in the Bible
  3. Interest in nature – the “absentee landlord” phenomenon
  4. Interest in science and scientific experiments
  5. Optimism – experiments in utopian communities
  6. Sense of a person’s duty to succeed
  7. Constant search of the self – emphasis on individualism in: a. personal religion. b. study of the Bible for personal interpretation

Characteristics of the 18th Century

Dawn of liberalism: freedom from restraint; age of revolutions in America and in France (1789); experimentation in science; economic concept of laissez-faire; the presence of the frontier; the development of rational religion known as deism; scientific curiosity; growth in nationalism; growth in materialism; the age of the gifted amateur; and belief in progressivism

(*note: the end of the above video covers Revolutionary literature)

11th Grade American Literature Spring 2018

Setting SMART Goals for Success

 

Each unit this semester I will be asking you to reflect on your progress and create two goals for yourself – I will be setting two goals for all of you, but I’d like you to brainstorm the rest.

These goals should be relevant to your experience in this class – please don’t set goals for Math (I won’t be able to guide and help you achieve those)…these goals should focus on your use of language, communication, writing, analysis skills, or even general academic goals such as improving your time management, finding a more effective way to study, avoiding procrastination, ect.

You’ll be keeping track of these goals, setting a plan of action, and revisiting to reflect on your progress in each unit.

Please click here to access your goal setting sheet if you lost yours, and review the notes below about how to set SMART goals! 

 

 

 

Specific: – A specific goal has a much greater chance of being accomplished than a general goal. To set a specific goal you must answer the six “W” questions:

*Who:  *What:  *Where:  *When:  *Which:  *Why

Specific means reasons, purpose or benefits of accomplishing the goal.

EXAMPLE: A general goal would be, “I want to lose some weight.” A specific goal would be, “I want to lose 10 pounds in 2 months and I will eat properly and exercise at least 3 days a week to accomplish my goal.”

 

Measurable: – Establish criteria for measuring progress toward the attainment of each goal you set.

Describes how each goal will be measured (numeric or descriptive).

When you measure your progress, you stay on track, reach your target dates, and experience the exhilaration of achievement that spurs you on to continued the effort required to reach your goal.

Ask yourself:

  • How will I know when the result has been achieved?
  • How will I verify the achievement/performance of this goal?

 

Attainable: – When you identify a goal, write it out and make a plan, you are making an attainable goal. You will see opportunities arise that will help you in accomplishing this goal. You will develop a positive attitude working towards an attainable goal and you will develop traits that will give you the strength to see it through.

 

Realistic: – To be realistic, a goal must represent an objective toward which you are both willing and able to work. A goal can be both high and realistic; you are the only one who can decide just how high your goal should be. But be sure that every goal represents substantial progress.

In my book there are no Dreams or Goals too grand, but you do have to be realistic. Make sure the goal you have set is something you are willing and capable of doing. When you set a lofty goal and challenge yourself you will find the reward that much better

 

Timely: – Creates a sense of urgency. Knowing you have to accomplish a task at a certain time makes you accountable. Know what those time lines are. What needs to be done by when. How much needs to be saved by when and take the steps necessary to meet those timelines.

Source

11th Grade American Literature Mrs Pierce Recommends Spring 2018

What skills will I need to demonstrate on Unit Test 1?

Remember, as you prepare for our first Unit Test, you will have to demonstrate the skills we have been practicing in class, not just the information you have learned. You will need to be familiar with the content of:

  • Native American Literature and The Oral Tradition as well as Creation Stories
  • Anne Bradstreet’s ‘T o My Dear and Loving Husband’
  • Johnathan Edward’s “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God”

But you will also need to show me you can use the skills you’ve practiced with these texts:

  • Identifying archetypes
  • Identifying theme
  • Identifying tone, and pointing to words or phrases the set tone.
  • Understanding how a writer appeals to their audience with ethos, pathos and logos.
  • Summarizing the plot or purpose of these historical texts.
  • Analyzing a text for literary devices
  • Explaining how those devices make a text more effective.
  • Citing textual evidence.
  • Writing constructed responses.
  • Vocabulary from the texts in unit 1.

Be sure to review your notes, go back and watch the videos and posts on this site, and feel free to contact me via Remind 101 if you have questions while you review and study.

 

 

11th Grade American Literature Spring 2018

SOAPSTone Plus – A Review

We’re jumping right into rhetorical analysis this semester, and therefore you will need to briefly review the arch methods analysis using SOAPSTone Plus that we covered last semester. Below you will find a review and an example.

 

Arch Method

Arch Method Rowlandson

 

 

 

You can also click here to review an in-depth powerpoint over the SOAPSTone Plus analysis method.

Please let me know if you have any questions or issues over this review!

 

 

11th Grade American Literature Spring 2018 Uncategorized

Sinners In The Hands of An Angry God – Johnathan Edwards

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As we move into ‘The Great Awakening’ in our study of American Literature, we will be analyzing the rhetorical power of Edward’s famous sermon, “Sinners In The Hands Of An Angry God”. Edward’s use of startling imagery and terrifying depictions of the wrath of God are shocking even for today’s modern audience, but would have been absolutely terrifying to the members of his congregation during his own time period.

Below you will find a brief video with background information on Edwards that YOU SHOULD DEFINITELY WATCH FIRST, follow by a PDF of the Sermon and the audio to the sermon. Download the PDF and follow along as you listen to the Youtube video of the sermon… make notes of the rhetoric Edward’s uses. This homework should take roughly an hour tonight, but all you have to do is listen and make light annotations!  (I would suggest looking back at the Mary Rowlandson post if you don’t remember what all you should be looking for when you conduct a rhetorical analysis!)

Click here for “Sinners In the Hands of An Angry God.”

For my exchange students and ELL learners, click here for the summary of the final paragraphs of the sermon.

And finally, click here for the full audio of his sermon. 

 

Can’t wait to discuss this with you tomorrow! 🙂

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11th Grade American Literature Spring 2018

Anne Bradstreet Poetry Analysis and Video Notes

 

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Anne Bradstreet – and some ducks.

Please see the video below for the notes over Anne Bradstreet that you will need for class. Remember to keep in mind the differences between to emotional appeals in Bradstreet’s poetry and their effectiveness compared to Bradford’s appeals in Of Plymouth Plantation… you will need to discuss this in depth at some point this week!

As we analyze both ‘The Author to Her Book’ and ‘The My Dear and Loving Husband’, but sure to pay attention to how Bradstreet always manages to book-end her expressions of humanity and worldliness with her pious beliefs. Also, be sure to know the significance behind many of her allusions!

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11th Grade American Literature Spring 2018

Video Notes – Early American Literature – The Puritans

Students – As we move away from the oral tradition of the Native Americans and begin to examine the literature of the Puritans, take a moment to watch the brief video at the link below. You should be gathering your background notes on the period from this video.

Remember that the readings from ‘CommonLit’ are still considered a part of the texts you can be tested on – it is your responsibility to print a copy of these readings out on your own time if you need a copy to review later (I HIGHLY RECOMMEND printing our digital readings out…you guys tend to have a harder time remembering the texts that you read online!).

Remember to continue to consider our essential questions for this unit as we move forward – you will be expected to write a reflection on one of these questions in your journal, and I will expect you to be able to reference the readings and make connections between them!

  • How did we become a ‘nation’?
  • Which experiences in living in a new land nurture the individual and the community?
  • How does the land make a difference to experience?
  • What ‘freedom’ mean?
11th Grade American Literature Spring 2018