The How and Why of Language – Poetry and Art: Starry Night

In class today we began discussing the ways that you can view language and poetry in much the same way you view art – paintings, and photographs.  First, we discussed that we’ll be trying to answer the questions:

  • Why would you use certain poetic devices?
  • How does using these devices change the meaning/theme of a poem?

Throughout this unit we’ll be working on answering these questions together for each of the poetic devices we encounter, and recording them on our “How and Why of Language” chart, which you can access by clicking here.

Next, we discussed the different elements that catch our eye or that we notice when we look at a picture or work of art. We discussed how bright colors catch our eye, and that sometimes we even associated certain meanings or feelings with these colors (i.e. red = danger, yellow=warm, blue=sad, depressed, cold). You guys did a great job of making connections between some of the artistic elements and similar literary elements:

Artistic Element Poetic/Literary Element
Color Imagery, or Symbolism
Texture Imagery
Images Imagery
Lines/Movement Line breaks, stanzas, enjambment
Lighting Imagery
Level of detail Imagery
Emotion Mood/Tone
Contrast Juxtaposition
Symbols

Symbolism

 

 

Next, we looked at a series of images, and you guys analyzed the artistic elements that caught your eye – you did a great job of noticing the use of contrast and line, as well as texture, to draw our attention to certain parts of the image. You also did a good job of discussion the possible connotative meaning of these images – focusing on the symbolism behind the shapes and colors.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After all this, we zoomed out and looked at the painting as a whole, Van Gogh’s “Starry Night”. We discussed how, just like a poem, you can analyze small parts of a work of art and still find details and insight – but without looking at everything as a whole, you cannot determine the theme or meaning.

Now, you will read the poem about this painting by Anne Sexton, titled “The Starry Night”. As you read this poem, look back and the painting and make connections. Look at Sexton’s use of imagery, personification and metaphor – how are they similar to the techniques Van Gogh used to create his painting?

Click here to read Anne Sexton’s “The Starry Night”

Finally, be sure to answer the writing prompt below over the poem by Anne Sexton – you must cite your evidence in MLA format. Remember, you will include the author’s last name and line numbers, and use a bracket to indicate when there should be a line break.

“…This is how/I want to die” (Sexton 5-6).

The prompt: 

  • What is the main idea of the poem that is reinforced through the refrain?
  • How is this main idea also reinforced through other poetic devices throughout the poem? 
10th Grade Literature Spring 2019

Parts of Speech – Pronouns

After our parts of speech pre-assessment yesterday, it seems we need to cover some of the different elements of pronouns together.

There are proper nouns, which give a specific name to an organization, person or place.

There are also personal pronouns, which identify a specific person place or thing and indicate singularity or plurality, and antecedents, which replace or reference pronouns.

Click here to review the pronoun powerpoint for our warm-ups this week.

You can also review the video below if you are having trouble with pronouns and antecedents:

Additionally, we discussed possessive pronouns. One thing to remember here is that possessive pronouns do not have apostrophes. ‘

Many of you were using it’s instead its. 

We also examined relative pronouns, which connect two clauses two a nouns or pronoun.

For example, “Cecil, who cannot swim, avoid fishing on the open water.” The first clause “Cecil avoids fishing on the open water” is connected to “who cannot swim”, as ‘who’ is the relative pronoun referring to Cecil.

 

10th Grade Literature Spring 2019

Welcome Back Sophmores!

Over the course of this semester we will explore a variety of world literature through fiction, poetry, speeches, legal documents and other primary source manuscripts from various periods, locations and times. We’ll also focus on other skills that will improve your understanding of English – through analyzing and making connections to art, conducting research and creating digital presentation, and practicing public speaking and small group communication skills.

I look forward to our journey through World Literature together!

Please click here to access your class syllabus.

You also need to make sure to sign up for our Remind 101, as well as our Google Classroom.

1st block: Text @mrsp10lit to 81010 for Remind101 and use code: i9km69 for Google Classroom.

3rd block: Text @b1010lit at 81010 and use code: 9u8dgp6 for Google Classroom.

10th Grade Literature Spring 2019