Analyzing African Literature – The Memoir

Over the course of the past week in class you have been assigned one of three African texts – either an epic, a memoir or a short story. With your classmates you had to not only read and understand the story, but also consider what it teaches you about African culture, literature and the experiences of Africans. Below you will find an overview of the assignment you will be working on, as well as links to the story, the reading questions, and the vocabulary needed for the story.

Click here for the short story ‘The Dark Child’.

Click here for the reading questions over ‘The Dark Child’.

Working in your groups, be sure to completely the following analysis and be able to present your analysis to the class:Laye camara

  1. Analyze the title of the text… what does it mean?
    What does it symbolize? What does it tell you about the story?
  2. Define memoir, and explain why your story is a good example of a memoir.
  3. Be able to summarize the text and walk your classmates through the plot.
  4. Explain what this text taught you about African culture, or literature.
  5. Have a visual aid that your classmates can use to gain additional information about your text.

Click here for the rubric on how your presentation will be graded.

Vocabulary from ‘The Dark Child

  • Concession
  • Blithely
  • Ecstatic
  • Decreed
  • Millet
  • Pestle
  • Mortar
  • Malign
  • Futile

Missed some of the notes from class? No problem – Click here for the notes over your classmates’ presentation of ‘The Dark Child’.

10th Grade Literature Fall 2015

Analyzing African Literature – The Short Story

Over the course of the past week in class you have been assigned one of three African texts – either an epic, a memoir or a short story. With your classmates you had to not only read and understand the story, but also consider what it teaches you about African culture, literature and the experiences of Africans. Below you will find an overview of the assignment you will be working on, as well as links to the story, the reading questions, and the vocabulary needed for the story.

Click here for the short story ‘A Chip of Glass Ruby’.

Click here for the reading questions over ‘A Chip of Glass Ruby’.

Working in your groups, be sure to completely the following analysis and be able to present your analysis to the class:lady_from_rajasthan_in_traditional_jewelry_rb15

  1. Analyze the title of the text… what does it mean?
    What does it symbolize? What does it tell you about the story?
  2. Define the short story, and explain why your story is a good example of an short story.
  3. Be able to summarize the text and walk your classmates through the plot.
  4. Explain what this text taught you about African culture, or literature.
  5. Have a visual aid that your classmates can use to gain additional information about your text.

Click here for the rubric on how your presentation will be graded.

Vocabulary from ‘A Chip of Glass Ruby’

  • Tome
  • Scandalous
  • Reproach
  • Morose
  • Sallow
  • Patronize
  • Presumption
  • Repute
  • Incitement
  • Plait
  • Conveyed
  • Pretoria

Missed some of the notes from class? No problem – Click here for the notes over your classmates’ presentation of ‘A Chip of Glass Ruby’.

10th Grade Literature Fall 2015

Analyzing African Literature – The Epic

Over the course of the past week in class you have been assigned one of three African texts – either an epic, a memoir or a short story. With your classmates you had to not only read and understand the story, but also consider what it teaches you about African culture, literature and the experiences of Africans. Below you will find an overview of the assignment you will be working on, as well as links to the story, the reading questions, and the vocabulary needed for the story.

Click here for an excerpt from ‘The Epic of Sundiata’.

Click here for the reading questions over ‘The Epic of Sundiata’.

Working in your groups, be sure to completely the following analysis and be able to present your analysis to the class:

  1. Analyze the title of the text… what does it mean? large-window_sundiata-illustrationWhat does it symbolize? What does it tell you about the story?
  2. Define the epic, and explain why your story is a good example of an epic.
  3. Be able to summarize the text and walk your classmates through the plot.
  4. Explain what this text taught you about African culture, or literature.
  5. Have a visual aid that your classmates can use to gain additional information about your text.

Click here for the rubric on how your presentation will be graded.

Vocabulary from ‘The Epic of Sundiata’

  • Fathom
  • Taciturn
  • Affront
  • Innuendo
  • Estranged
  • Initiation
  • Soothsayer
  • Derisively
  • Efface

Missed some of the notes from class? No problem – Click here for the notes over your classmates’ presentation of ‘The Epic of Sundiata’.

10th Grade Literature Fall 2015

African Poetry Mini Project

In class we will be analyzing poetry specifically from African in this unit. Below you will find the poem we will be reading, and the instructions for the ‘mini project’. I really want you guys to focus on identifying THEME in this assignment… its a very important skill that you still need to practice.

Click here for the packet of African Poems from class.

  1. Read ALL of the poems in the packet.
  2. Pick ONE poem that you like the most, enjoy the imagery of, or have the strongest reaction to.
  3. Identify the THEME of that poem.
  4. PICK ONE of the three options below to complete using the THEME of the poem of your choice:

Option 1: Make a full color pictorial illustration of the theme of your poem.

Option 2: Find a SCHOOL APPROPRIATE song that has the same theme as your poem (bonus if the lyrics are similar too!)

Option 3: Annotate the poem in detail, and explain the theme.

 

 

10th Grade Literature Fall 2015

‘A Civil Peace’ by Achebe – African Literature

This week we began reading literature from the continent of Africa. Our first story was ‘A Civil Peace’ by Chinua Achebe, and you had to conduct an analysis of this story in class. We discussed the idea of philosophical assumptions about life, and specifically examined the philosophical assumptions of the main character in Achebe’s story, Johnathan. We discuss how, despite his experiences and hardships during the war in his country, he managed to stay optimistic and positive, and could we do the same.

Below you will find the ‘Theme and Philosophical Assumptions’ worksheet from class in case you did not finish it, and a copy of the text. Remember, these assignments are due when you come in next week!

Click here to read a PDF of the story ‘Civil Peace’.

Click here to access the ‘Civil Peace Theme and Philosophy’ worksheet.

10th Grade Literature Fall 2015

Unit 2 – The Literature of Africa and the Middle East

As we began our next unit over literature from Africa and The Middle East, please make sure you’ve taken the time to get the notes from myself and your classmates who presented today! The literature of this region is rich and diverse – and it pre-dates the Greek literature we’ve already read in many cases!

 

As we examine the importance of historical and modern African and Middle Eastern literature, be sure to remember just HOW BIG the region is, and just how DIVERSE! We can only do an overview of their rich literature in class, but if you’re interested in learning more it could make a great topic for the research paper you’ll do later in the semester!

true-size-of-africa

Click here for the 1st Block Group Presentation over African Literature by Zy, Nigela and Tilor.

Click here for the 4th Block Group Presentation over Africa Literature by Nijah, Montanna and Robert.

Click here for Mrs. Pierce’s Presentation over Middle Eastern Literature.

 

10th Grade Literature Fall 2015

Unit 1 Test – Ancient Greek Literature

Below you will find a list of concepts and skills you will need to demonstrate to pass the unit test over Ancient Greek Literature.  I will also list where in your notes you should have this information – remember, you had all day in class to talk with me one-on-one, work with a classmates to get any notes or assignments you were missing, and make flashcards or foldables to help you study.

You Unit 1 Test will cover:

All of the Unit 1 Vocabulary (listed on the website) – you will need to know the definitions and be able to identify the words in context.

The Hero’s Journey – you will need to know the 12 parts (in your notes, we covered it in class) as you will need to be able to apply it to one of the stories we have read (this is exactly what you did for the Cupid and Psyche project, so make sure you review that assignment).

Archetypes – know plot, character and theme archetypes and be able to reference the most commonly used ones we have read about (notes over archetypes in the story are on the website).

Ancient Greek Stories – be familiar with the plot of ‘Prometheus’ and ‘Cupid and Psyche’ (notes and the stories are on the website).

Ancient Greek Poetry – know the types of poetry and the three most famous Ancient Greek poets. Be able to identify literary devices in Greek poetry (review your ppt notes over Greek poetry).

Constructed Response– be able to write an effective constructed response using the 2pt rubric. Please see the link below for the constructed response you will have to write on the test if you would like to practice tonight (Remember, you CAN use ‘pink sheets’ on your test…. that means you can use the rubric I gave you!)

Click here for the Unit 1 Constructed Response Question

10th Grade Literature Fall 2015

Translating the Poetry of Sappho

For the past two days we have been examining the lyric poetry of Ancient Greece, and are focusing our attention on one poem in particular by the female poet Sappho. We discussed literary devices you should be looking for in poetry (see the Unit 1 Vocabulary post for the list) and now you are ready to begin analyzing poetry!

In class we looked at an original version of the poem in Greek script, in Roman script and Greek Language, and then two translations of the poem into English. The first translation is from the 1870’s, which means the diction you will find in it is a little ‘old fashioned’. The final translations of the poem is in a modern version, which should be much easier to read!

Click here to read the four versions of the Sappho Love Poem

Remember, you should be identifying the devices listed below for each poem, and explaining the elements in Part 2 on a separate piece of paper. Everything you needs for this analysis should be in your notes over Ancient Greek Poets and vocabulary.

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Over the next few days you will read and analyze these poems in class and on your own, before writing your own translation of Sappho’s poem!

Click here for the assignment sheet over ‘Writing Your Own Sapphic Poem’.

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10th Grade Literature Fall 2015

Looking forward to exploring World Literature

In this class students will explore the WORLD - different countries and their people through the lens of prose, poetry and rhetoric. Students will hopefully leave this course with a better understanding of what it means to be a global citizen, how we are connected to individuals around the world through experience and emotion. 

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10th Grade Literature Fall 2015