After analyzing how a speaker’s adopted ‘persona’ impacts their use of rhetoric through an examination of a series of letters by Thomas Jefferson, you will now look at how different speakers with the same persona use a variety of different rhetorical devices based on differing audiences.

During the Expansionist period of American Literary History, we see an up-tick in writings by women, as they took to the factories to work or began to desire the opportunities for advanced education and more equal protection under the law. These were only the very early beginnings of what would later be the reform movement of ‘Women’s Suffrage’ – while women of this period did desire change for their circumstances, they still largely delivered in the idea of ‘Republican Womanhood’ and ‘The Cult of Domesticity’. Please remember this context as you analyze the documents – their ideals are not exactly the same as women of the suffrage movement, progressive era movements or 20th century feminism that you might already be familiar with. To conduct an accurate analysis you need to make sure you understand the historical context for these documents!

 

If you need the background notes from the 1st half of the video we viewed in class, please see it below:

In your groups you have been assigned an excerpt from a piece of journalism, “A real picture of factory life” by an anonymous female factory worker. Conduct a SOAPSTone analysis of the document, and answer the constructed response questions over it.  The powerpoints below may help with your analysis.

Lowell Mill Girls Protest Powerpoint 1

Lowell Mill Girls Protest Powerpoint 2